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US ‘tells India it respects its right to self-defence’ after cross-border militant attack kills 44 paramilitary police
Sat, 16 Feb 2019 14:35:00 -0500

US ‘tells India it respects its right to self-defence’ after cross-border militant attack kills 44 paramilitary policeThe US has supported India’s right to “self defence” against cross-border terrorism after an attack claimed by Pakistan-based militants killed at least 44 police officers in the disputed territory of Kashmir. In comments that will please Indian hawks but also raise fears that tensions between India and Pakistan could escalate yet further, US national security advisor John Bolton reportedly told his counterpart in Delhi, that America “offered all assistance to India” to bring the perpetrators of the attack to justice. Mr Bolton and Ajit Doval also “resolved to hold Pakistan to account for its obligations under UN resolutions”, India’s foreign ministry said in a statement.


Court filing: Manafort faces more than 19 years in prison
Fri, 15 Feb 2019 20:54:26 -0500

Court filing: Manafort faces more than 19 years in prisonWASHINGTON (AP) — Paul Manafort, the one-time chairman of Donald Trump's presidential campaign, could spend more than 19 years in prison on tax and bank fraud charges, prosecutors said Friday.


North Koreans pay tribute to Kim's father in freezing cold
Sat, 16 Feb 2019 04:00:41 -0500

North Koreans pay tribute to Kim's father in freezing coldThe Day of the Shining Star dawned bitterly cold in Pyongyang. Kim, the son of the isolated North's founder Kim Il Sung and the father and predecessor of current leader Kim Jong Un, was born on February 16. According to Pyongyang's orthodoxy, he came into the world in 1942, in a snow-covered hut at a secret camp on the slopes of Mount Paektu, the spiritual birthplace of the Korean people, where his father was fighting occupying Japanese forces.


Reporter to Trump: "What do you base your facts on?"
Fri, 15 Feb 2019 11:53:28 -0500

Reporter to Trump: "What do you base your facts on?"President Trump spars with a reporter who presses him on his immigration facts after Trump declared a national emergency at the U.S.-Mexico border. Rough Cut (no reporter narration).


Family of IS teen appeals to UK to help bring her home
Fri, 15 Feb 2019 16:22:46 -0500

Family of IS teen appeals to UK to help bring her homeLONDON (AP) — The family of a pregnant British teenager who ran away to join the Islamic State group urged the government Friday to help bring her home.


United Airlines: Three new routes for fast-growing Denver hub
Fri, 15 Feb 2019 10:17:50 -0500

United Airlines: Three new routes for fast-growing Denver hubUnited Airlines will add three new domestic routes at its Denver hub, all of which will go head-to-head against budget rival Frontier Airlines.


Shamima Begum: What could happen to the Isil bride?
Fri, 15 Feb 2019 06:32:40 -0500

Shamima Begum: What could happen to the Isil bride?The way the Government has dealt with those returning to the UK from the Middle East having been involved with terrorist groups has always been a scrutinised subject.  The Shamima Begum case has prompted fresh discussions over how Britain manages those returning or attempting to come back from Syria, once gripped by the tyranny of Islamic State (Isil). Ms Begum was one of three schoolgirls, along with Kadiza Sultana and Amira Abase, from Bethnal Green Academy who left the UK in February 2015. She married an Isil fighter and is now nine-months pregnant with her third child. Her first two children died.  Ms Begum's family has pleaded for the 19-year-old to be shown mercy and to be allowed to return to east London. The Home Secretary has warned he "will not hesitate" to prevent the return of Britons who travelled to join Isil, saying those who left the UK to join the terror group were "full of hate for our country". Security Minister, Ben Wallace, warned that runaways who now want to come back must realise that "actions have consequences". But what options do authorities have in such instances? Sent to Guantánamo Bay As revealed by Ben Riley-Smith, Robert Mendick and Laura Fitzpatrick on The Telegraph's front page on Friday, the United States is planning to send British Isil fighters to Guantánamo Bay amid frustration at the UK's failure to take responsibility for its homegrown terrorists. Senior US officials believe Guantánamo can house more than 50 Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant fighters, including the two surviving British members of the so-called "Beatles" terrorist cell that executed Western hostages. It has emerged that the vast majority of Islamist fighters returning to the UK from Syria have been placed on "secretive" government rehabilitation schemes rather than prosecuted. Despite British concern, Guantánamo Bay is being readied in the run-up to Donald Trump's withdrawal of US troops from Syria as soon as April. There is acute frustration within the Trump administration over how Britain and other western European countries are refusing to take back their foreign fighters for prosecution in their own courts. Returning jihadis: What other countries do Arrest and prosecution Home Secretary Sajid Javid has said those who make it back "should be ready to be questioned, investigated and potentially prosecuted". But authorities have faced difficulties obtaining evidence to prove someone committed crimes in Syria.  Most recently, The Isil Beatles have caused the Government enormous problems. Two of the four suspected terrorists' fate has been left in limbo as the UK and the US play tug-of-war with where they will end up in court.  The Home Office previously blocked their return, and they could end up in an American federal court facing the death penalty after the CPS said there was "insufficient evidence" for them to be tried in the UK.    uk drops opposing of death pen Figures disclosed in the Commons last year suggested that only around one in 10 returnees has been prosecuted over "direct action" in Syria, although ministers say a significant proportion of those who have come back were assessed as no longer being of national security concern. New legislation which passed earlier this week made it an offence to enter or remain in overseas terror hotspots, officially termed "designated areas". Remain in Syria If Begum is not repatriated, the Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) could hand her over to neighbouring Iraqi forces, Middle East Correspondent Josie Ensor explains. The Telegraph is aware of at least three cases, including European citizens, where male Isil suspects have been transferred from Syria to Iraq to face trial. This would be a controversial option as Baghdad has the option to impose the death penalty, which the UK opposes. Foreign detainees are currently being held by the SDF in an area of Kurdish self-rule in northeastern Syria. The SDF has said that they do not have the money or resources to hold them forever. Islamic State losing its grip on Syria They have warned that if Turkey invades, which it has threatened, it could see the prisoners being set free in the chaos. The Syrian Kurds are also in talks with the Syrian government about ceding some of their territory, which could see some foreign prisoners being handed over to the regime. A third option - Mustafa Bali, the SDF spokesman, has called for an international court to be set up in Syria. This would see them tried by international judges in Syria but return home to serve their sentence. However, sources at the UN say it would be difficult if not impossible to set up such a court in Kurdish-held territory without the authority of the Syrian government. Managed return to UK Powers known as temporary exclusion orders (TEOs) were introduced in 2015. They can last for up to two years and can be imposed on those suspected of involvement in terrorism abroad, making it unlawful for them to return to the UK without engaging with authorities. The powers were unused in 2016, while nine TEOs were issued in 2017. Removal of citizenship In cases where the Government determines that such action is "conducive to the public good", it can deprive an individual of their British citizenship. The power can be used in a range of circumstances, including national security cases. Figures for 2017 show that 104 people were deprived of their citizenship - up from 14 in the previous year. Isil schoolgirls' journey into Syria The Government is barred from using the powers if it would render someone stateless, except if the individual was naturalised as a British citizen and is believed to be able to acquire citizenship of another country. Former independent reviewer of terrorism legislation Lord Carlile has said the UK would have to re-admit Ms Begum if she has no other nationality. TPIMs Terrorism Prevention and Investigation Measures (TPIMs) allow the Home Secretary to impose a range of disruptive measures on individuals who are suspected of posing a threat to security but who cannot be prosecuted, or, in the case of foreign nationals, deported. Restrictions can include relocation to another part of the country, electronic monitoring and limits on the use of phones and computers. As of the end of August, six TPIMs were in force. Deradicalisation back in Britain Returnees could be referred to the Government's £40 million a year Prevent programme, which aims to stop people being drawn into terrorism. There were 7,318 individuals referred to Prevent in 2017/18. The schoolgirl who turned to Isil In most cases, referrals are found to require no further action or passed to other services, but when authorities conclude there is a danger the person could be drawn into terrorism, they can be supported through a voluntary scheme known as Channel. Prevent is backed by ministers and police, but has been described as "toxic" by critics, and the Government announced earlier this year that it would be independently reviewed.


NASA mulls buying new rides to space from Russia amid program delays
Fri, 15 Feb 2019 14:00:06 -0500

NASA mulls buying new rides to space from Russia amid program delaysThe U.S. space agency has since had to rely on Russia's Roscosmos program to ferry astronauts to the orbital space station at a cost of roughly $80 million per seat, NASA has said. After 2019 there are no seats available on the spacecraft for U.S. crew, and a NASA advisory panel recommended on Friday that the U.S. space program develop a contingency plan to guarantee access to the station in case technical problems delay Boeing and SpaceX any further. A NASA spokesman on Friday characterized a solicitation request NASA filed on Wednesday as a contingency plan.


Amazon's New York City Deal Was Killed By a Cocktail of Hubris and Miscalculations
Fri, 15 Feb 2019 08:52:35 -0500

Amazon's New York City Deal Was Killed By a Cocktail of Hubris and MiscalculationsIt's a huge loss for Amazon


Sarah Huckabee Sanders Interviewed by Special Counsel’s Team
Fri, 15 Feb 2019 17:33:51 -0500

Sarah Huckabee Sanders Interviewed by Special Counsel’s TeamWhite House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders sat for an interview with Special Counsel Robert Mueller's investigators, she revealed Friday."The president urged me, like he has everyone in the administration, to fully cooperate with the special counsel. I was happy to voluntarily sit down with them," Sanders said.While the details of the interview are not public, one area investigators are interested in is how Trump crafted his public statements on the investigation, a matter Sanders would have knowledge of. As a public face of the administration, Sanders has made numerous statements defending the president's conduct as it pertains to the investigation.Former White House chief of staff John Kelly, former White House communications director Hope Hicks, former press secretary Sean Spicer, and other White House officials have also answered questions from Mueller's team.Mueller is expected to soon wrap up his investigation into Russia's efforts to influence the 2016 election. Then-acting attorney general Matthew Whitaker said in January that the investigation is "close to being completed."


The 20 Most Powerful Crossovers and SUVs You Can Buy in 2019
Fri, 15 Feb 2019 14:35:00 -0500

The 20 Most Powerful Crossovers and SUVs You Can Buy in 2019


California braced for mudslides and torrential rain after devastating storm
Fri, 15 Feb 2019 06:21:02 -0500

California braced for mudslides and torrential rain after devastating stormAuthorities have warned of the threat of mudslides after a damaging storm struck California, trapping people in floodwaters, triggering a debris flow which destroyed homes and forcing residents to flee communities scorched by wildfires last year. The powerful system swept in from the Pacific Ocean and unleashed rain, snow and wind across the US west coast into Wyoming and Colorado after walloping northern California and southern Oregon. The National Weather Service reported staggering rainfall amounts across California, including more than 24cm over 48 hours at one location in the San Bernardino Mountains east of Los Angeles.


US sanctions Venezuela officials close to 'former President' Maduro
Fri, 15 Feb 2019 10:43:31 -0500

US sanctions Venezuela officials close to 'former President' MaduroThe US Treasury announced Friday it was imposing sanctions on five intelligence and security officials close to crisis-hit Venezuela's "former" President Nicolas Maduro. Among the five men is Manuel Quevedo, described by the Treasury as the "illegitimate" president of Venezuela's state-owned oil firm, PDVSA.


Aurora shooting victims ranged from intern to plant manager
Sat, 16 Feb 2019 20:08:18 -0500

Aurora shooting victims ranged from intern to plant managerCHICAGO (AP) — The victims of a disgruntled employee who opened fire at a suburban Chicago industrial warehouse were co-workers ranging from an intern to the plant manager. A look at the victims:


Honda's pickup trucks recalled because they can catch fire from car wash soap
Fri, 15 Feb 2019 12:56:53 -0500

Honda's pickup trucks recalled because they can catch fire from car wash soapThe Honda pickup is subject to a new recall to fix faulty fuel pumps that can crack when exposed to acids in car-wash detergents.


2020 Vision: Buckle up, America! It’s gonna be a long, crowded campaign
Fri, 15 Feb 2019 10:13:21 -0500

2020 Vision: Buckle up, America! It’s gonna be a long, crowded campaignCandidates are crowding into the race, and to judge by this week's developments, the 2020 presidential cycle will make the last one seem tranquil.


Watch a space harpoon impale a piece of space debris
Fri, 15 Feb 2019 11:52:28 -0500

Watch a space harpoon impale a piece of space debrisThe U.S. government tracks 500,000 chunks and bits of space junk as they hurtle around Earth. Some 20,000 of these objects are larger than a softball.To clean up the growing mess, scientists at the University of Surrey have previously tested a net to catch chunks of debris. Now, they've successfully tested out a harpoon.The video below, released Friday by the university's space center, shows a test of the experimental RemoveDEBRIS satellite as it unleashes a harpoon at a piece of solar panel, held out on a 1.5-meter boom.The harpoon clearly impales its target. "This is RemoveDEBRIS' most demanding experiment and the fact that it was a success is testament to all involved," Guglielmo Aglietti, director of the Surrey Space Centre at the University of Surrey, said in a statement. Next, the RemoveDEBRIS team -- made up of a group of international collaborators -- is planning its final experiment: responsibly destroying the satellite.In March, the RemoveDEBRIS satellite will "inflate a sail that will drag the satellite into Earth's atmosphere where it will be destroyed," the university said a statement. This is how the group intends to vaporize the future dangerous debris it catches. SEE ALSO: Trump fails to block NASA's carbon sleuth from going to spaceHuman space debris hurtles around Earth faster than a speeding bullet, with debris often traveling at 17,500 mph, or faster. The threat of collisions is always present, though in some orbits the odds of an impact are significantly lower than others. The International Space Station, for instance, is in a relatively debris-free orbit, but even here there is the threat of "natural debris" -- micrometeors -- pummeling the space station.Other orbits have considerably more debris spinning around Earth. In 2009, a derelict Russian satellite slammed into a functional Iridium telecommunication satellite at 26,000 mph, resulting in an estimated 200,000 bits of debris. In 2007, the Chinese launched a missile at an old weather satellite, spraying shrapnel into Earth's orbit.This risk amplifies as more satellites are rocketed into space. SpaceX now has government-approved plans to launch thousands of its Starlink satellites into orbit -- perhaps by the mid-2020's, should they amass money for the pricey program. This would double or triple the number of satellites in orbit."It is unprecedented," said Kessler, NASA's former senior scientist for orbital debris research told Mashable. "The sheer number, that's the problem."Kessler has long warned about the potential of catastrophic chain reactions in Earth's orbit, wherein one collision creates enough weaponized debris to create a cycle of destruction. Designs to harpoon dangerous chunks of debris are just being tested in space today, but the technology could prove critical as Earth's orbit grows increasingly trafficked with large, metallic satellites.   WATCH: Ever wonder how the universe might end?


Back in the Bronx, Ocasio-Cortez says to keep up the fight
Sat, 16 Feb 2019 18:36:08 -0500

Back in the Bronx, Ocasio-Cortez says to keep up the fightNEW YORK (AP) — Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez returned to her home district in the New York City borough of the Bronx on Saturday to encourage her supporters to keep up the kind of activism that resulted in Amazon rescinding its plan to build a campus in the city.


Isil bride Shamima Begum has a legal right to return to the UK, head of MI6 says
Fri, 15 Feb 2019 09:45:04 -0500

Isil bride Shamima Begum has a legal right to return to the UK, head of MI6 saysThe British Islamic State (Isil) bride Shamima Begum has a legal right to return to the UK the Head of MI6 has said. The Director General of MI6 has said that British citizens have a right to return home from Syria, even though they may still present a threat to national security. Alex Younger, the head of Britain’s Secret Intelligence Service - better known as MI6 - said he was "very concerned" about returning British nationals that had fought for or supported the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (Isil). Speaking ahead of the Munich Security Conference which started on Friday, Mr Younger said: "All experience tells us that once someone's put themselves in that sort of position they are likely to have acquired both the skills and connections that make them potentially very dangerous. "Anyone who has put themselves in this situation can expect to be questioned and investigated and potentially prosecuted if they return to our jurisdiction." When asked about the case of Ms Begum, the heavily pregnant 19-year-old Londoner who travelled to Syria four years ago to become an Isil bride and who now wants to return to the UK to have her baby, Mr Younger said: "British nationals have a right to come to the UK." Kadiza Sultana, left, Shamima Begum, center, and Amira Abase going through security at Gatwick airport Credit: Metropolitan Police Britain’s intelligence chief cautioned about showing triumphalism at the demise of Isil, saying such an approach led to hubris. "The military defeat of the caliphate does not represent the end of the terrorist threat that we face," he said. "You can’t use military force to kill and idea." Mr Younger warned that Isil was already in the process of trying to grow elsewhere around the world, even as its fighters are defeated in Syria, and that the threat from al-Qaeda had not been completely extinguished. He said: "Daesh [Isil] is a resilient organisation and it is reorganising, returning to its natural state as an asymmetric transnational terrorist organisation. We see it morphing, spreading out. "Al-Qaeda...has undergone a certain resurgence as a result of the degradation of Daesh and it is a force that should also be taken seriously. It is definitely not done out, and is something we should remain focused on." Mr Younger was keen to stress the "strength and unconditional nature of the UK security offer" and said Brexit would not harm enduring partnerships. "Britain’s commitment to the security of the European continent is unconditional," he said. "Our aim is to strengthen our security partnerships in Europe, alongside our other intelligence partnerships across the globe, because that is the inescapable logic of a world of increasingly international hybrid threats." The ability to "operationalise" partnerships with other intelligence organisations was critical in preserving our way of life, he said, and was used to great effect after the nerve-agent attack in Salisbury last year. Referring to the intelligence sharing relationships with France and Germany he said: "There are people alive in our three countries today because of terrorist attack plans that we have successfully disrupted, showing the value and importance of cooperation to all sides. This is not a one-way street." "Even in the past year...people’s lives have been saved in all of our countries as a result of this cooperation. The counter terrorist machine is working as it should. Bombs haven’t gone off as a result of our capacity to exchange data with each other. "Brexit doesn’t fundamentally alter those relationships."


It Looks Like the Land Rover Discovery SVX Is Dead
Fri, 15 Feb 2019 17:54:00 -0500

It Looks Like the Land Rover Discovery SVX Is DeadThis looks like another miss from Jaguar Land Rover Special Vehicle Operations.


Chicago police: Jussie Smollett assault case has 'shifted'
Sat, 16 Feb 2019 22:41:48 -0500

Chicago police: Jussie Smollett assault case has 'shifted'CHICAGO (AP) — Chicago police said Saturday the investigation into the attack reported by Jussie Smollett has "shifted" due to information received from two brothers arrested in the case then released, and police want to interview the "Empire" actor again.


Iran general says Pakistan backs group behind suicide bomb
Sat, 16 Feb 2019 04:00:28 -0500

Iran general says Pakistan backs group behind suicide bombIran's Revolutionary Guards accused "Pakistan's security forces" of supporting the perpetrators of a suicide bombing that killed 27 troops on Wednesday, in remarks state TV aired Saturday. "Pakistan's government, who has housed these anti-revolutionaries and threats to Islam, knows where they are and they are supported by Pakistan's security forces," said Revolutionary Commander Major General Mohammad Ali Jafari, referring to jihadist group Jaish al-Adl ("Army of Justice").


BofA Says a ‘Real’ Trade Deal Could Vault S&P 500 to Record High
Fri, 15 Feb 2019 13:23:11 -0500

BofA Says a ‘Real’ Trade Deal Could Vault S&P 500 to Record HighThe firm’s model on corporate earnings and equity valuations suggests that the market has priced in “a partial deal,” one where only some of the issues get resolved in favor of corporate America, according to strategists led by Savita Subramanian. In a best-case scenario, the S&P 500 could climb 5 percent to 10 percent when a “real deal” is struck. Companies from 3M Co. to Stanley Black & Decker Inc. have slashed their guidance this year, citing either trade tensions or weakening demand in China.


More rain, snow expected in storm-battered California, following days of mudslides and floods
Fri, 15 Feb 2019 14:47:44 -0500

More rain, snow expected in storm-battered California, following days of mudslides and floodsCalifornians were in clean-up mode Friday as the state slowly recovers from an onslaught of rain, wind and snow, which brought widespread flooding and mudslides.


Trump doesn’t let facts get in the way of declaring a national emergency
Fri, 15 Feb 2019 21:12:04 -0500

Trump doesn’t let facts get in the way of declaring a national emergencyA U.S. Border Patrol agent listens from the front row as President Donald Trump declares a national emergency at the U.S.-Mexico border during remarks about border security in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, D.C., Feb. 15, 2019. President Trump’s rambling declaration of a national emergency, the intent of which was to fund a barrier along hundreds of miles on the U.S. border with Mexico, was filled with factual inaccuracies, misleading statements and contradictions. In his Rose Garden remarks on Friday, Trump repeated many of the same disproven claims he has made over the last several weeks about drug smuggling, human trafficking and other crime at the border.


Polestar teases next-gen electric car again ahead of Geneva launch
Fri, 15 Feb 2019 10:39:14 -0500

Polestar teases next-gen electric car again ahead of Geneva launchJust two weeks before the official online reveal on February 27, Volvo's Polestar gave us another glimpse of the Polestar 2 just a couple of weeks after the first announcement. While the latest official teaser of the Polestar 2 isn't nearly as informational as the first announcement made a few weeks ago, we have still been graced by another image of a discernible part of the exterior body: the top, left-hand side of the rear end. The white Polestar logo blends into the white body to avoid distracting onlookers from the snappy and chic design.


During a school lockdown, 7-year-old writes note on her arm in case she dies
Fri, 15 Feb 2019 13:11:52 -0500

During a school lockdown, 7-year-old writes note on her arm in case she diesA second-grader wrote a chilling note to her parents on her arm during school lockdown.


UK PM May will fall if she relies on opposition to pass Brexit deal: lawmaker
Fri, 15 Feb 2019 02:35:07 -0500

UK PM May will fall if she relies on opposition to pass Brexit deal: lawmakerBritish Prime Minister Theresa May's government will collapse if she relies on the opposition Labour Party to pass her Brexit deal, an influential pro-Brexit lawmaker said on Friday. Steve Baker said the Northern Irish party whose 10 members of parliament props up Britain's government would withdraw support for the government because they are opposed to the inclusion of the so-called Irish border backstop.


Denver teachers back at work after winning deal with raises
Fri, 15 Feb 2019 00:30:03 -0500

Denver teachers back at work after winning deal with raisesDENVER (AP) — Denver teachers ended a three-day walkout and returned to their classrooms Thursday, greeted by hugs and high-fives, after their union reached a tentative deal raising their pay, the latest win in a national movement by educators to raise their wages and advocate for changes in schools.


Cardinal expects 'significant progress' at sex abuse summit
Fri, 15 Feb 2019 09:18:51 -0500

Cardinal expects 'significant progress' at sex abuse summitDETROIT (AP) — The U.S. archbishop helping to organize next week's summit of the world's bishops at the Vatican on sexual abuse by clergy said Thursday he expects to make "significant progress" in responding to the scandal that's riven the church, and that lay Catholics will help to hold the hierarchy accountable.


Pence visits Auschwitz after saying Iran plotting 'new Holocaust'
Fri, 15 Feb 2019 09:28:48 -0500

Pence visits Auschwitz after saying Iran plotting 'new Holocaust'US Vice President Mike Pence on Friday paid homage to victims of the Holocaust at the former Nazi German Auschwitz-Birkenau death camp, a day after he accused Iranian authorities of plotting a "new Holocaust". More than a million European Jews perished at the site located in then German-occupied southern Polish town of Oswiecim during World War II. Pence passed through the Auschwitz camp's infamous wrought-iron "Arbeit macht frei" ("Work makes you free") gate before laying a wreath at the death wall where the Nazis executed thousands of people.


U.S. Weighs New PDVSA Sanctions as Next Step Against Maduro
Fri, 15 Feb 2019 22:37:53 -0500

U.S. Weighs New PDVSA Sanctions as Next Step Against MaduroThe move is one of several options the administration is considering to help the country through a “major” political transition, according to Representative Michael McCaul of Texas, the top Republican on the House Foreign Affairs Committee, and two people familiar with the matter. “I know the White House and the Treasury Department are focused on the best path forward, but the main goal is to ensure that we preserve the assets and resources that rightfully belong to the Venezuelan people and block the Maduro regime from using them for personal gain and repression,” McCaul said in an emailed statement.


Our Favorite Eco-friendly Finds Put Sustainable Materials to Stylish Use
Fri, 15 Feb 2019 08:00:00 -0500

Our Favorite Eco-friendly Finds Put Sustainable Materials to Stylish Use


Dash Cam Footage Shows Utah Police Chief`s DUI Arrest
Fri, 15 Feb 2019 18:53:04 -0500

Dash Cam Footage Shows Utah Police Chief`s DUI ArrestThe Utah Highway Patrol has released dash camera video from a DUI stop that led to the arrest of the Mantua Police Chief.


A national emergency has been declared. Now what?
Fri, 15 Feb 2019 16:51:20 -0500

A national emergency has been declared. Now what?On Friday morning, President Trump declared a national emergency in order to secure funding for a border wall, triggering what will likely be a long legal battle before anything is built.


Southwest declares operations 'emergency' amid labor dispute with mechanics
Fri, 15 Feb 2019 21:00:54 -0500

Southwest declares operations 'emergency' amid labor dispute with mechanicsThe airline sent a strongly worded memo to mechanics ordering all hands on deck in response to a higher than usual number of planes out of service.


Bentley Bentayga Speed: an SUV as luxurious as it is powerful
Fri, 15 Feb 2019 09:40:57 -0500

Bentley Bentayga Speed: an SUV as luxurious as it is powerfulOn Thursday Bentley unveiled the Bentayga Speed, an SUV with a top speed of 190 mph and 0- 62mph acceleration time of 3.9 seconds. Bentley celebrated its Valentine's Day by announcing what it calls the "world's fastest, most luxurious SUV:" the Bentayga Speed.


India's PM Modi warns Pakistan of strong response to Kashmir attack
Fri, 15 Feb 2019 12:46:23 -0500

India's PM Modi warns Pakistan of strong response to Kashmir attackThe car bomb attack on a security convoy on Thursday was the worst in decades of insurgency in the disputed region. India said it had "incontrovertible evidence" of Pakistani involvement, a statement quickly rejected by Islamabad. The attack comes months before national elections in India.


New 2020 Porsche Taycan EV Details Revealed in Spy Photos
Fri, 15 Feb 2019 09:46:00 -0500

New 2020 Porsche Taycan EV Details Revealed in Spy Photos


US Facebook fine over privacy could be in billions: reports
Fri, 15 Feb 2019 11:03:33 -0500

US Facebook fine over privacy could be in billions: reportsA US investigation into privacy violations by Facebook could result in a record fine running to billions of dollars, media reports said Friday. The Federal Trade Commission is negotiating the terms of the penalty stemming from its investigation into whether Facebook violated a 2011 settlement with the regulator on protecting user data, the Washington Post and New York Times said, citing unnamed sources. The FTC reopened its investigation following revelations last year that personal data from tens of millions of Facebook users was hijacked by the political consultancy Cambridge Analytica as it worked on Donald Trump's presidential campaign.


The Latest: Extremist attack in Nigeria kills 4 civilians
Sat, 16 Feb 2019 12:11:30 -0500

The Latest: Extremist attack in Nigeria kills 4 civiliansYOLA, Nigeria (AP) — The Latest on Nigeria's postponed presidential election (all times local):


Make El Chapo pay for a border wall? Don't count on it
Fri, 15 Feb 2019 10:17:00 -0500

Make El Chapo pay for a border wall? Don't count on itNEW YORK (AP) — After El Chapo's conviction in a drug-trafficking trial that included florid testimony of jewel-encrusted guns, a fleet of cash-laden jets and a personal zoo with roaming big cats, some Americans have floated an idea they see as poetic justice: Why not take some of the Mexican drug lord's billions in ill-gotten gains and make him pay for a border wall?


`Going Away Party` for School Shutting Down Because of Student`s Death Causes Controversy
Fri, 15 Feb 2019 23:00:25 -0500

`Going Away Party` for School Shutting Down Because of Student`s Death Causes ControversySome parents are outraged a California school for kids with special needs is holding a "going away party" after one of its own students died after being restrained by staff.


Email Address Given to Ocasio-Cortez Beau Sparks Heated Exchange
Sat, 16 Feb 2019 14:51:37 -0500

Email Address Given to Ocasio-Cortez Beau Sparks Heated Exchange“While you were having a nice Valentine’s Day, @AOC decided to put her boyfriend on staff -- drawing a salary on the taxpayer’s dime. Nice to see her adapting to the swamp so quickly,” the conservative magazine’s Luke Thompson said on his Twitter feed. Other conservative voices piled on, with Katrina Pierson, an adviser to President Donald Trump’s re-election campaign, who suggested that “her jobs for everyone starts with her boyfriend.


Supermoon? Snow Moon? Full moon? Whatever you call it, a lunar spectacle is coming soon
Fri, 15 Feb 2019 11:47:44 -0500

Supermoon? Snow Moon? Full moon? Whatever you call it, a lunar spectacle is coming soonWhether you call it full, snow or super, the biggest, brightest moon of the year is coming to a sky near you Tuesday.


Archaeologists discover Incan tomb in Peru
Sat, 16 Feb 2019 08:22:53 -0500

Archaeologists discover Incan tomb in PeruPeruvian archaeologists discovered an Incan tomb in the north of the country where an elite member of the pre-Columbian empire was buried, one of the investigators announced Friday. The discovery was made on the Mata Indio dig site in the northern Lambayeque region, archaeologist Luis Chero told state news agency Andina. Archaeologists believe the tomb belonged to a noble Inca based on the presence of "spondylus," a type of sea shell always present in the graves of important figures from the Incan period, which lasted from the 12th to the 16th centuries.


Deal or delay? Wall Street doesn't believe no-deal Brexit threat
Fri, 15 Feb 2019 08:04:59 -0500

Deal or delay? Wall Street doesn't believe no-deal Brexit threatUnless Prime Minister Theresa May can get a Brexit deal approved by the British parliament, then she will have to decide whether to delay Brexit or thrust the world's fifth largest economy into chaos by leaving without a deal on March 29. Goldman Sachs said it sees a 50 percent probability of May getting a Brexit divorce deal ratified, adding that lawmakers would ultimately block a no-deal exit if needed. Goldman said it saw the probability of a no-deal exit at 15 percent and the probability of no Brexit at around 35 percent.


In America, high-speed train travel is off track
Fri, 15 Feb 2019 01:11:58 -0500

In America, high-speed train travel is off trackCalifornia's suspension this week of a high-speed rail project underscores the up-hill battle the modern mode of transport faces in the United States -- including myriad cultural, political and economic obstacles. Long gone are the days of the 19th century gold rush, when Americans raced to build transcontinental rail links and conquer the nation's vast expanse. "We have a Congress polluted by special interest money ... that has been working for years to stop/prevent any rail investment," said Andy Kunz, head of the US High Speed Rail Association, pointing to the oil, aviation and auto industries in particular.


France plans to impose stricter regulations on social media platforms
Fri, 15 Feb 2019 12:15:10 -0500

France plans to impose stricter regulations on social media platformsFrance is to impose stricter regulation of abusive posts on social media to end “online impunity” and compel platforms such as Facebook and Twitter to take down hateful posts. The move follows a scandal over a macho “boys' club” of male media executives who trolled female colleagues online. Eight journalists and public relations executives have have resigned or been suspended this week after they admitted anonymously hounding feminists and minority colleagues online. All eight belonged to a closed Facebook group called “The League of LOL”. More than 20 others faced calls to resign after they were also accused of bullying women with pornographic memes and off-colour jokes about rape. Mounir Mahjoubi, the digital affairs minister, said the government was considering changing the legal status of social networks to make them more accountable for user-generated content.  They could be reclassified in somewhere between social media platforms and publishers, making them liable to heavier fines and tighter regulation, which is already the case in Germany. At a glance | Facebook’s moderation rules The current status of networks such as Facebook and Twitter as content-sharing platforms “significantly limits their responsibility” for online abuse and harassment, Mr Mahjoubi said. A bill which is to be presented to the French parliament by the end of June will be partly inspired by existing German legislation, said Marlène Schiappa, the minister for gender equality. The bill will also aim to speed up the identification of those who put up hateful messages, and foster more public awareness of the “duty of care” of social networks, Mr Mahjoubi said. “It’s unacceptable to have them dictating the rules all by themselves… The authors of hateful content must understand that we will find them wherever they are and we will make them stop their violence.” Britain is also planning a legal crackdown on harmful content online. Margot James, the digital minister, said last week that voluntary codes had failed and platforms should be made legally responsible for user-generated content on their sites. She was speaking after the death of 14-year-old Molly Russell, who killed herself after watching self-harm images and suicide posts on Instagram.


Pompeo visits Iceland as US-EU rift on Iran grows
Fri, 15 Feb 2019 09:27:57 -0500

Pompeo visits Iceland as US-EU rift on Iran growsREYKJAVIK, Iceland (AP) — U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo wrapped up a five-nation tour of Europe in Iceland on Friday after the Trump administration launched a scathing attack on the European Union over its approach to Iran.



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