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Death of troubled officer whose gun wasn't taken away marks record number of suicides in NYPD
Thu, 19 Sep 2019 12:53:51 -0400

Death of troubled officer whose gun wasn't taken away marks record number of suicides in NYPDA police officer's recent death has disturbingly highlighted the record number of suicides among members of the New York Police Department this year.


PHOTOS: Rescued sea otter pups being named in a digital contest
Thu, 19 Sep 2019 13:44:43 -0400

PHOTOS: Rescued sea otter pups being named in a digital contestHeading into Sea Otter Awareness Week, people across the country will have a say in how two rescued southern sea otter pups at Chicago’s Shedd Aquarium get names. The aquarium will host a digital naming contest focused on building affinity and understanding around sea otters and inspiring voters to also make their voices heard in support of conservation legislation and protections that are critical for vulnerable species.


How Iran Would Unleash an 'All Out War': Lots of Missiles
Thu, 19 Sep 2019 10:19:00 -0400

How Iran Would Unleash an 'All Out War': Lots of MissilesIf Trump decides to strike here is how Tehran could respond.


South Korea police say they may have found serial killer
Thu, 19 Sep 2019 10:10:59 -0400

South Korea police say they may have found serial killerSouth Korean police said Thursday that they have found a suspect thought to be an infamous serial killer wanted for the slaying of nine women some 30 years ago. Senior police officer Ban Gi-soo said police have continued their investigation into the 1986-1991 slayings even after the statute of limitations expired 13 years ago in order to find the truth. Ban said the technological improvement of DNA analysis allowed authorities to extract DNA samples from evidence that wasn't possible at the time of the cases.


Women’s March Dismisses New Board Member amid Backlash over Statements Comparing ISIS to U.S. Military
Thu, 19 Sep 2019 09:23:05 -0400

Women’s March Dismisses New Board Member amid Backlash over Statements Comparing ISIS to U.S. MilitaryZahra Billoo, who joined the board of the Women's March just several days ago, announced on her Twitter feed Thursday morning that she has been voted off the board.Billoo has a history of controversial statements on Twitter, in which she has compared the U.S. and Israeli militaries to ISIS and Nazis, once even asserting that the FBI recruits "mentally ill" people to join ISIS.The Women's March has not released a statement explaining the justification for her dismissal as of this writing.However, Billoo asserted in a tweet thread that she was voted out as a result of an "Islamophobic smear campaign led by the usual antagonists, who have long targeted me, my colleagues, and anyone else who dares speak out in defense of Palestinian human rights and the right to self determination."Addressing the controversy over her tweets, she wrote "In looking at the tweets in question, I acknowledge that I wrote passionately. While I may have phrased some of my content differently today, I stand by my words."> In looking at the tweets in question, I acknowledge that I wrote passionately. While I may have phrased some of my content differently today, I stand by my words. 15/> > -- Zahra Billoo (@ZahraBilloo) September 19, 2019Billoo stated on Facebook in 2017 that she would not go to see the movie "Wonder Woman" because of the participation of actress Gal Gadot, who served in the Israeli Defense Forces. She justified her stance by saying she would similarly not see a movie in which the lead actress was proud of being a member of ISIS, al-Qaeda, or the U.S. military.In a 2014 post on Twitter, Billoo said she was opposed to "all terrorism, including all that regularly committed by the US military and Al Qaeda, the Israeli Defense Forces and ISIS.”Billoo and other new members were hired to replace three former Women's March leaders dogged by allegations of anti-Semitism. Two of these members, Tamika Mallory and Linda Sarsour, have drawn fire for their support of Louis Farrakhan, the anti-Semitic leader of the Nation of Islam.


Man who allegedly changed adopted daughter's age then abandoned her turns himself in
Thu, 19 Sep 2019 08:14:12 -0400

Man who allegedly changed adopted daughter's age then abandoned her turns himself inAn Indiana couple has been charged with neglect after allegedly changing their daughter's age from 11 to 22, moving to Canada and leaving her behind.


All the National Coffee Day deals and freebies you should take advantage of
Thu, 19 Sep 2019 12:59:54 -0400

All the National Coffee Day deals and freebies you should take advantage ofNational Coffee Day takes place on Sept. 29 and luckily for customers, there are tons of deals and even free cups of coffee to be had.


Trump: San Francisco to get environmental violation for homelessness
Thu, 19 Sep 2019 15:03:32 -0400

Trump: San Francisco to get environmental violation for homelessnessPresident Trump said late Wednesday that his administration would issue a notice of environmental violation against the city of San Francisco because of what he described as its homelessness problem.


Alien enthusiasts descend on Nevada desert near secretive U.S. base
Thu, 19 Sep 2019 15:27:41 -0400

Alien enthusiasts descend on Nevada desert near secretive U.S. baseScores of UFO enthusiasts converged on rural Nevada on Thursday for a pilgrimage of sorts to the U.S. installation known as Area 51, long rumored to house government secrets about alien life, as law enforcement officials beefed up security around the military base. Visitors descended early in the day on the tiny desert town of Rachel, a short distance from the military site, in response to a recent, viral social-media invitation to "storm" Area 51 on Friday, raising concerns by local authorities of unruly crowds overwhelming the community. Situated about 150 miles (240 km) north of Las Vegas, the remote hamlet of just 50 year-round residents lacks a grocery store or even a gasoline station.


Dozens of people charged for illegally distributing millions of opioid pills
Wed, 18 Sep 2019 16:38:00 -0400

Dozens of people charged for illegally distributing millions of opioid pillsDozens of people - including six doctors and seven pharmacists - have been charged with fraud for illegally distributing more than 6 million opioid pills.Some of the pills were obtained using counterfeit prescription pads, and the stolen identities of legitimate doctors, prosecutors say.


Earth to 2020 Democrats. The Syrian civil war was not caused by climate change.
Thu, 19 Sep 2019 05:00:24 -0400

Earth to 2020 Democrats. The Syrian civil war was not caused by climate change.This is a sad excuse for real discussion on climate change and international conflict, two very separate issues.


Dan Rather: Corey Lewandowski Won Car-Crash CNN Interview, ‘The Press and Best Interests of the Country Lost’
Wed, 18 Sep 2019 17:01:26 -0400

Dan Rather: Corey Lewandowski Won Car-Crash CNN Interview, ‘The Press and Best Interests of the Country Lost’Steven Ferdman/GettyWednesday’s CNN appearance by former Trump campaign manager Corey Lewandowski, the morning after he acknowledged to the House Judiciary Committee that he feels no obligation to be honest with the news media, re-ignited an ongoing debate among staffers at the cable network over who should and not be accorded airtime if they are simply using it as a forum to mislead.CNN Brings on Corey Lewandowski, a Known Liar, for Totally Batshit InterviewThe controversial booking of Lewandowski also provoked a barrage of criticism from journalists who argued that he’s a confirmed liar who can’t be trusted by viewers to be a credible source of information.Lewandowski is himself a former paid CNN commentator whose 2016 hiring, after being dismissed by Trump, embarrassed the network when it was disclosed that he was continuing on the Trump campaign payroll at $20,000 a month while working for CNN.Among CNN’s critics is former CBS News anchor Dan Rather, who told The Daily Beast that he agrees with concerns that Lewandowski’s appearance didn’t serve the public, and that a fiery televised confrontation of the kind that occurred Wednesday potentially helps the Senate Republican primary campaign Lewandowski is widely expected to launch soon in his native New Hampshire.“Unfortunately, the Congress, the press and the best interests of the country—in my opinion—lost that round,” Rather, who runs the News and Guts Media production company and anchors shows on AXS TV and The Young Turks YouTube channel, said in an email. CNN Worldwide President Jeff Zucker declined to respond to the criticism on the record, as did several staffers reached by The Daily Beast. A quick spot survey of  CNN employees, however, suggested that some CNN employees agree with Rather while other staffers believe that it’s not the news media’s job to censor government officials or prominent political figures such as Lewandowski, but instead to bring them on, interrogate them, and hold them accountable. During a 16-minute-long exchange that shed far more heat than light, Lewandowski regularly dodged, talked over and shouted over New Day anchor Alisyn Camerota’s questions and repeatedly insulted the network that once wrote him handsome checks.Lewandowski accused CNN of “hypocrisy” for employing fired FBI acting director Andrew McCabe as an on-air analyst, even as McCabe is being targeted by the Trump Justice Department for a criminal referral for allegedly making false statements to the DOJ inspector general.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


State sending troopers to help fight St. Louis crime
Thu, 19 Sep 2019 19:09:42 -0400

State sending troopers to help fight St. Louis crimeMissouri Gov. Mike Parson is sending highway patrol troopers and other state workers to St. Louis as part of an effort to fight the surge of violent crime that has included the killings of more than a dozen children in the region so far this year. Parson said the total cost of the state's commitment, including the 25 state employees who will work in the St. Louis region, is up to $4 million. "This is about targeting violent criminals and getting them off the street," Parson said at a news conference in St. Louis.


View Photos of Porsche's 911 RSR in Coke Livery
Wed, 18 Sep 2019 14:39:00 -0400

View Photos of Porsche's 911 RSR in Coke Livery


How to make ratatouille, a vegetable dish that's both hearty and healthy
Thu, 19 Sep 2019 14:59:59 -0400

How to make ratatouille, a vegetable dish that's both hearty and healthyThis fall ratatouille recipe works perfectly as a side dish or a delicious vegetarian main. The different colored veggies looks great on the table, too.


Injured crewman sues California dive boat owner after 34 diein fiery tragedy
Thu, 19 Sep 2019 15:44:27 -0400

Injured crewman sues California dive boat owner after 34 diein fiery tragedyRyan Sims filed the suit last week in Ventura County Superior Court saying the Conception dive boat was unseaworthy and operated in an unsafe manner.


Makeup guru Bobbi Brown reveals her top six favorite products from Walmart
Wed, 18 Sep 2019 15:50:23 -0400

Makeup guru Bobbi Brown reveals her top six favorite products from WalmartIf we're going to take beauty advice from anybody, it's going to be Bobbi Brown. 


Guatemala joins ranks of cocaine producers as plantations and labs emerge
Thu, 19 Sep 2019 11:41:09 -0400

Guatemala joins ranks of cocaine producers as plantations and labs emergeGuatemala is no longer just a transit point for traffickers seeking to smuggle cocaine north towards the United States, authorities said on Thursday after security officials discovered several coca plantations and processing laboratories. The finds underscored concerns that cocaine production is moving beyond Andean nations, where the leaf has traditionally been grown, and closer to its main market, the United States. The discoveries of coca plantations and laboratories in different locations prompted Interior Minister Enrique Degenhart to admit Guatemala was now a cocaine-producing nation.


Russia detains shaman on mission to 'banish Putin'
Thu, 19 Sep 2019 10:26:30 -0400

Russia detains shaman on mission to 'banish Putin'Russian police on Thursday said they had detained a Siberian shaman trekking towards Moscow on a mission to expel "demon" President Vladimir Putin, picking up a crowd of supporters on the way. Police in the eastern Siberian region of Buryatia told Interfax they had detained Alexander Gabyshev, the shaman, on a highway near Lake Baikal and would put him on a flight back to his home region where he is "wanted for committing a crime". Gabyshev's eccentric bid to walk from his home city of Yakutsk to Moscow, a distance of over 8,000 kilometres (5,000 miles), has seen a group of followers join him on the way.


Here's Why Russia Has Detained 161 North Korean Sailors
Thu, 19 Sep 2019 05:31:00 -0400

Here's Why Russia Has Detained 161 North Korean SailorsIs a crisis brewing over illegal fishing?


Rep. Omar accuses Trump of endangering her life
Wed, 18 Sep 2019 14:54:15 -0400

Rep. Omar accuses Trump of endangering her lifeRep. Ilhan Omar accused President Trump on Wednesday of endangering her life by “continuing to spread lies” that she “partied” on the anniversary of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks on the United States.


View Every Angle of the 2020 Zero SR/F Electric Motorcycle
Wed, 18 Sep 2019 13:59:00 -0400

View Every Angle of the 2020 Zero SR/F Electric Motorcycle


The Latest: Conditions in Houston improve as Imelda departs
Thu, 19 Sep 2019 22:53:31 -0400

The Latest: Conditions in Houston improve as Imelda departsHouston officials say floodwaters are receding across most of the city and efforts will continue through the night to clear the city's freeways of hundreds of vehicles stalled by the flooding. The dangerous flooding all but paralyzed the city Thursday after the remnants of Tropical Storm Imelda reversed course and hit Houston and Southeast Texas a second time.


This Activist Invited ICE to a Community Meeting. Days Later They Arrested Him.
Thu, 19 Sep 2019 04:51:06 -0400

This Activist Invited ICE to a Community Meeting. Days Later They Arrested Him.Smith Collection/Gado/GettyWhen Houston immigration activist Roland Gramajo Reyes invited U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents to a public meeting for people worried about being arrested due to their immigration status, he didn’t think he’d end up behind bars.He was wrong. Gramajo’s longtime advocacy on behalf of Houston’s immigrant and Latino communities, family, attorney, and allies said, make them seriously doubt that the timing of his apprehension was an accident.Now, Gramajo, 40, is caught in a tug-of-war between law enforcement agencies seeking to either deport him after 25 cumulative years in the United States, or to first incarcerate him for improper entry into the United States, a charge that could land him in prison.Handout“His bond was denied Monday by a federal judge, so he will remain in detention while his illegal reentry charges are resolved,” Raed Gonzalez, Gramajo’s attorney, told The Daily Beast. “We are trying to reopen his immigration case… Many hurdles await us, but we are trying our best.”Gramajo, a father of five and grandfather of two, was born in Retalhuleu, Guatemala in 1979, and first moved to Houston at age 15. Since then, he has made the improvement of the Guatemalan community and his adopted hometown his life’s mission.He founded the Centro Organizativo Guatemalteco, which raises funds for humanitarian causes in Guatemala, as well as the Southwest American Systems Chamber of Commerce, which helps minority children participate in sports and beauty pageants. After Hurricane Harvey devastated the city in 2017, he took weeks off work to organize community efforts in helping those affected by the storm’s flooding that caused an estimated $125 billion in damage. For his work, Gramajo has received commendations from a host of state and local organizations, including the Alief Independent School District, Houston Community College, the Golden Eagle Society, and the Houston City Council.Only days before his apprehension by ICE, Gramajo had organized a “know your rights” seminar for undocumented immigrants and their families in the city—the seminar to which he had invited immigration agents to participate. That invitation, Gramajo’s defenders believe, may have unintentionally goaded ICE into looking into Gramajo’s immigration status, a charge ICE has called “baseless.”“To be abundantly clear, ICE personnel did not attend this Immigration Forum in any capacity—official or unofficial,” the agency released in a statement last week, saying that Gramajo became a target after ICE received an anonymous tip about his status. “To portray him in one-sided media reports… as a victim of some ‘covert’ law enforcement operation is an insulting affront to public safety.”“We’re not gonna be able to comment any further on the anonymous tip” that led to Gramajo’s apprehension, ICE spokesperson Tim Oberle told The Daily Beast when asked about the timing of the tip that lead to his arrest, “because it’s anonymous, obviously.”At the heart of ICE’s deportation case is Gramajo’s 1998 guilty plea to a misdemeanor charge of burglary of a vehicle, for which he was sentenced to 20 days in prison. Gramajo’s family told reporters in Houston that the charge was the result of a practical joke that he had played on a friend, the vehicle’s owner.After his plea, immigration authorities commenced deportation proceedings against Gramajo, culminating in his deportation to Guatemala in summer 2004. Gramajo returned months later to be with his family in Houston—including his wife and children—and has remained ever since.It’s that 2004 illegal entry for which Gramajo will stand trial. If he is found guilty, he could face a six-month prison sentence before his potential deportation.“My sons, they are texting me asking how is their father, and that’s what hurts the most,” Magaly Quicano, Gramajo’s wife, told reporters in Houston last week. “I’ve been praying, praying praying that he will win this immigration battle.”Gramajo’s defenders, who count members of Houston’s political establishment among their members, told The Daily Beast that the potential deportation of the father of five is disgraceful.“The prospect of deporting Mr. Gramajo is outrageous,” Mayor pro tem Ellen Cohen, a member of the Houston City Council, told The Daily Beast. Last year, the city council commended Gramajo as “dedicated to serving and inspiring the community,” and whose “qualities represent a true leader with an exceptional drive to improve the quality of life” throughout the city.“His so-called ‘crime’ of coming back to this country—his country—after his 2004 deportation is a result of unjust laws. If I were in his shoes, I would have tried to find a way back to my spouse and children too,” Cohen added, noting that she has called upon ICE to immediately release him. “He is an asset to Houston and there is no legitimate public safety-related reason to deport him again. If ICE’s concern is public safety, they should be focusing their limited resources on those who are bringing violence, drugs, and human trafficking in to our communities.”Houston City Council member Steve Le, who brought forth a successful proposal last year to name May 17, 2018 as “Roland Omar Gramajo Reyes Day” in the city, called Gramajo “a good person and community leader” whose presence in the city makes it a better place to live. “Our office appreciates everything he has done for the community and recognized him with a Mayoral Proclamation for his achievements,” Le told The Daily Beast. “We were surprised by his arrest and hope the court will take into account all the great contributions he has made when determining his sentencing. We look forward to a favorable outcome for his family and our community.”But after a judge denied his bond in a hearing on Monday, Gramajo will remain in federal detention until trial. Even if he wins his criminal case, his presence in the United States is far from assured—if deported, Gramajo will be barred from entering the United States for 20 years.“I don’t know what the verdict will be, but I leave everything in the hands of God and wait,” Quicano said tearfully. “No more.”Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


Judge resigns after sharing noose image with 'Make America Great Again' slogan on Facebook
Wed, 18 Sep 2019 11:09:57 -0400

Judge resigns after sharing noose image with 'Make America Great Again' slogan on FacebookA New York town judge was forced off the bench after a written complaint said his post appeared 'to convey racial and/or political bias.'


Single 25-year-old mother of 3 diagnosed with terminal cancer: 'I'm scared of leaving them behind'
Thu, 19 Sep 2019 16:51:24 -0400

Single 25-year-old mother of 3 diagnosed with terminal cancer: 'I'm scared of leaving them behind'A single mother of three who had gone cancer-free for months has now been diagnosed with terminal cancer.


U.S. drone strike kills 30 pine nut farm workers in Afghanistan
Thu, 19 Sep 2019 11:44:57 -0400

U.S. drone strike kills 30 pine nut farm workers in AfghanistanA U.S. drone strike intended to hit an Islamic State (IS) hideout in Afghanistan killed at least 30 civilians resting after a day's labor in the fields, officials said on Thursday. The attack on Wednesday night also injured 40 people after accidentally targeting farmers and laborers who had just finished collecting pine nuts at mountainous Wazir Tangi in eastern Nangarhar province, three Afghan officials told Reuters. "The workers had lit a bonfire and were sitting together when a drone targeted them," tribal elder Malik Rahat Gul told Reuters by telephone from Wazir Tangi.


A 22-year-old from Minneapolis who is jailed in Syria says ISIS recruited him on Twitter
Wed, 18 Sep 2019 11:10:03 -0400

A 22-year-old from Minneapolis who is jailed in Syria says ISIS recruited him on TwitterAbdelhamid Al-Madioum, a naturalized US citizen, told CBS News his story from a prison in Syria, run by the US-backed Syrian Democratic Forces.


How Vietnamese Commandos Sank A U.S. 'Aircraft Carrier'
Wed, 18 Sep 2019 10:43:00 -0400

How Vietnamese Commandos Sank A U.S. 'Aircraft Carrier'The sinking of the Card was a stunning victory for the Viet Cong, yet little remembered today. It illustrated how vulnerable naval vessels can be even when faced with a low-tech enemy … and how difficult maintaining port security can be in a war with no real front.


Parents of Israeli held in Gaza plead for news, action five years on
Thu, 19 Sep 2019 15:14:13 -0400

Parents of Israeli held in Gaza plead for news, action five years onThe parents of an Israeli man believed to be held by Hamas in Gaza since 2014 travelled to Geneva this week to demand international action to help bring him home. Avera Mengistu, a 33-year-old Israeli of Ethiopian descent, is depressed and suffering from mental problems since the death of his older brother when he crossed into Gaza five years ago. Israel's defence ministry determined he was being held by Hamas, but the Islamist movement governing Gaza has to date provided no information about his whereabouts or condition.


Boris Johnson’s Brexit Gamble Might Take the U.K. Back to Square One
Thu, 19 Sep 2019 06:24:45 -0400

Boris Johnson’s Brexit Gamble Might Take the U.K. Back to Square OnePrime Minister Boris Johnson learned that he cannot leave the E.U. without a deal because of British Parliament, writes Ian Bremmer.


Cash-starved Air India putting crews on low-fat diet
Wed, 18 Sep 2019 07:57:14 -0400

Cash-starved Air India putting crews on low-fat dietCash-starved Air India is putting its crew on a diet, changing their inflight menu to special low-fat meals. Dhananjay Kumar, the state-run airline's spokesman, said Wednesday that the objective is to provide healthy and cost-effective meals to crews on domestic and international flights. Kumar declined comment on media reports that the cost per meal, mostly vegetarian, will fall to one-third of the current 500-800 rupees (up to $11) per meal.


2nd '500-year rainfall' in 2 years will cause $8 billion in damages, AccuWeather predicts
Thu, 19 Sep 2019 13:43:07 -0400

2nd '500-year rainfall' in 2 years will cause $8 billion in damages, AccuWeather predictsAngel Marshman wades through floodwaters from Tropical Depression Imelda after trying to start his flooded car Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2019, in Galveston, Texas. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip) AccuWeather estimates the total damage and economic loss caused by Imelda will be $8 billion, according to the company's Founder and CEO Dr. Joel N. Myers, based on an analysis of damages expected from major flooding caused by heavy rainfall over eastern Texas and far southwestern Louisiana.The estimate includes damage to homes and businesses, as well as their contents and cars, job and wage losses, farm and crop losses, contamination of drinking water wells, infrastructure damage, auxiliary business losses and the long-term impact from flooding, in addition to the lingering health effects resulting from flooding and the possible disease caused by standing water.AccuWeather's damage estimate incorporates independent methods to evaluate all direct and indirect impacts of the storm based on a variety of sources, statistics and unique techniques to estimate damage developed over a decade.Given the major flooding with a high risk to lives and property in eastern Texas and far southwestern Louisiana, Imelda is rated as a 3 on the AccuWeather RealImpact™Scale for Hurricanes for the overall tropical storm. The AccuWeather Local StormMax™rainfall amount is projected to be 55 inches; despite that high total, Imelda is a 3 because the coverage area receiving the heaviest rain is not a large or populated area, such as Houston, during Hurricane Harvey in 2017. Imelda was never rated on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale by the National Hurricane Center."This storm is a great example of the value of the AccuWeather RealImpact™Scale for Hurricanes that we invented," Myers said. "It would be easy to dismiss Imelda since it is not a hurricane but a tropical storm, but the rain and subsequent flooding is the main source of what will be substantial damage." Deep tropical moisture will continue to stream northward from the Gulf of Mexico with heavy rain bands expected to continue impacting the area Thursday night and perhaps even early Friday. A very heavy rain band east of Houston continues to drop copious rainfall amounts of 3 to 4 inches per hour, adding to flooding that is ongoing in some areas."The rain and resulting flooding will be the overwhelming cause of damage and discomfort and threats to life and property," Myers said. "The amount of rainfall will rival records set during Hurricane Harvey, which makes this the second 500-year rainfall within two years."George Bush Intercontinental Airport in Houston was at a full ground stop because of the rainfall and severe weather in the area as of Thursday morning. Some parts of Texas are facing possible levee collapses and local emergency offices have asked residents of Harris, Montgomery, Liberty and Chambers counties to shelter in place in response to flood emergencies caused by Imelda.As flooding overwhelmed many access roads, access to Interstate 10 and Highway 69 from Beaumont became "extremely limited," the police department said. The City of Beaumont has closed non-essential offices for Thursday. The interstate was also closed in both directions near Highway 365 and Fannett.Click here to follow AccuWeather's extensive coverage of Imelda for more information.Download the free AccuWeather app to receive the latest forecast and tropical advisories. Stay tuned to the AccuWeather Network for Imelda coverage on DirecTV, Frontier and Verizon Fios.


'Fry an egg on that wall': Trump touts design, signs wall during visit to U.S.-Mexico border
Wed, 18 Sep 2019 19:28:15 -0400

'Fry an egg on that wall': Trump touts design, signs wall during visit to U.S.-Mexico borderPresident Donald Trump boasted about the design of new barrier fencing along the U.S.-Mexico border during a two-day visit to California.


Dascha Polanco dishes on her journey to body positivity
Wed, 18 Sep 2019 21:14:00 -0400

Dascha Polanco dishes on her journey to body positivityDascha Polanco, star of 'Orange is the New Black' and the upcoming musical 'In The Heights,' sat with AOL to share her struggles as a Latina in Hollywood.


Scientists reconstruct skeleton of elusive, pre-historic human
Thu, 19 Sep 2019 11:00:00 -0400

Scientists reconstruct skeleton of elusive, pre-historic humanResearchers in Israel say they have reconstructed the skeleton of a pre-historic human from a long-extinct and elusive species using DNA found in the pinky bone of a 13-year-old girl who died 70,000 years ago. Little is known about the Denisovans, who were ancient relatives of the more familiar Neanderthals and our own species. Evidence was first uncovered in 2008 in a cave in Siberia, and today it includes only three teeth, a pinky bone and a lower jaw, said Hebrew University genetics professor Liran Carmel.


Fukushima Nuclear Disaster Verdict Leads to Angry Fallout
Thu, 19 Sep 2019 12:54:54 -0400

Fukushima Nuclear Disaster Verdict Leads to Angry FalloutChristopher FurlongTOKYO—Three executives of Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) who ignored repeated warnings of a potential tidal wave that could result in a nuclear disaster, which did in fact take place, were found not guilty of criminal negligence resulting in death and injury by a Tokyo Court on Thursday. Many feel justice was poorly served. However, a former prosecutor says that the verdict was to be expected. * * *The Four-Hour Verdict* * *The Tokyo District Court ruled former executives of TEPCO were not guilty of criminal negligence, in the only criminal prosecution to come out of the 2011 nuclear disaster in Fukushima Prefecture, Japan.The cataclysm at the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in March of 2011 resulted in over 100,000 people losing their homes, wide-spread radioactive pollution, injuries, and the deaths of patients who had to be evacuated. The disaster, on the scale of Chernobyl, raised alarms around the world about nuclear energy and atomic safety. The disaster area has not been cleaned up entirely and is essentially a nuclear accident still in progress, requiring constant cooling. Radioactive water stored at the TEPCO facilities is likely to be dumped into the ocean next year—probably after the Olympics. The three former executives of TEPCO who were indicted on charges of professional negligence resulting in injury and death were: Tsunehisa Katsumata, 79, chairman of TEPCO at the time of the accident, and two former vice presidents—Sakae Muto, 69, and Ichiro Takekuro, 73. The trial centered on whether these three could be held criminally responsible for what the Japanese Parliament’s Fukushima Nuclear Accident Independent Investigation Commission called “a man-made disaster.” How the Earth Is Reclaiming Fukushima, the Ninth Ward, and Staten IslandThe central issue at stake could be summarized as this:  Did the TEPCO officials know about the possibility of a nuclear-meltdown-inducing tidal wave, when did they know, and what did they do—or not do about it? TEPCO’s six-reactor plant, located on the Pacific coast, was disabled after tsunamis triggered by the massive earthquake of March 11, 2011 flooded power supply facilities, which were unprotected, and crippled reactor cooling systems. Some reactors suffered fuel meltdowns, while hydrogen explosions damaged others.  The indictment blamed the three former executives for injuries to more than 10 people from hydrogen explosions at the plant, as well as the deaths of 44 patients forced to evacuate from nearby hospitals. As early as 2002, TEPCO and the Japanese government were aware of a potentially disastrous earthquake and tidal wave causing a nuclear accident. The prosecutors argued, and the court also acknowledged that several times between February 2008 and March 2009 the TEPCO executives were warned of the risk of a tidal wave 14 meters (45 feet) high or higher hitting the power plant and causing a potential nuclear disaster. On March 11, tidal waves between 11.5 and 15.5 meters (50 feet) did hit the power plant, knocking out the power grid and, yes, as predicted for years, triggering the nuclear disaster. There were also independent reports that suggested the earthquake's tremors caused a nuclear meltdown in the 40-year-old Reactor One even before the waves hit, but those allegations were not considered by the court.The verdict, which took several hours for the judges to finish reading out loud—starting at 1:15 p.m. and ending around 4:30 p.m. with a short break—concluded that while the TEPCO executives did receive several warnings of a tidal wave large enough to cause a nuclear accident, they were justified in taking no safety measures for a number of reasons:1) If they had taken the warnings seriously and tried to take countermeasures it would have required them to close the plant down temporarily, which was considered prohibitively expensive. 2) There were questions as to how seriously to take the data about tsunamis.3) Even if the TEPCO executives had acted on the warnings, they probably wouldn’t have completed safety countermeasures in time. In reaching the decision, the court stated that tsunami forecast information was vague, and that the three could not have “realistically” foreseen a disaster on such a grand scale. It took the judges so long to read out the explanation for their ruling because as ex-prosecutor Nobuo Gohara explains, “Legally the judgment made sense but on an emotional level, gut instinct level—it all seems wrong and the judges must know that. They wanted to convince people their judgment makes sense.”  Residents of Fukushima Prefecture took the judgment less gracefully. “It’s a disgrace. It’s a slap in the face and it shows that the courts here always value profits over people,” said a 67 year old farmer from the area who had come to hear the verdict himself this afternoon. Former prosecutor Gohara noted, “There are limits to the Japanese justice system and I have said from the start that it was unlikely the individuals would be found guilty. What you have in the Fukushima Nuclear disaster is a failure of policy and of the entire organization. Japan does not have a legal mechanism for holding a corporation responsible for criminal behavior, and in this case the charges were criminal negligence—on an individual level. The hurdle is very high to prove that.” * * *The Trial That Almost Never Took Place* * *The trial of TEPCO executives almost never took place at all.In June of 2012 residents of Fukushima Prefecture submitted criminal complaints against TEPCO executives and central government officials to try to make sure someone was found responsible for the nuclear accident. As noted, the Japanese Parliament’s Fukushima Nuclear Accident Independent Investigation Commission called it “a man-made disaster," so it would seem to follow that men should be help accountable.However, the Tokyo District Public Prosecutor's Office decided not to indict anyone named in those complaints. In typical Tokyo Prosecutor's Office fashion, they deliberately tried to bury the story at first by leaking their decision not to prosecute on the day Japan won the bid for the 2020 Olympics.Despite the best efforts of the prosecutors not to serve the public interest, a prosecutorial review board decided on two separate occasions that the former executives should be indicted and made to stand trial. The Prosecutorial Review Board system was introduced in May of 2009 as part of judicial reforms in Japan that included the introduction of a modified jury system. If eight of 11 citizens chosen for the board agree that the prosecutors have failed to do their job, and that indeed an indictment is warranted—on two separate occasions—the individual named must stand trial. The court designates civilian lawyers to act as prosecutors, who then indict the individual. In February of 2016, the three former executives were indicted formally. The trial began in June of 2017. All of the former executives pled not guilty. The prosecution asked for five years in prison. * * *Jokyo Kokumi* * *It should be noted that even after the TEPCO executives were indicted, they were not jailed, although the charges were very serious and involved loss of life. In Japan, suspects in criminal cases typically are arrested and held for up to 23 days. But the executives of TEPCO, who are politically connected, belong to what the Japanese public now angrily refer to as Jokyu Kokumi (upper-class citizens who are above the law) so they remained at large during the entire trial. Carlos Ghosn, the former Chairman of Nissan charged with far lesser crimes, but a foreigner, spent months in detention without bail while prosecutors tried to extract a confession. Miwa Chiwaki, a 49-year old woman who was living in a small village in Fukushima Prefecture at the time of the meltdown, was outraged by the verdict. She is the spokesperson for a group of citizens supporting the pursuit of criminal justice in the Fukushima nuclear disaster. She told The Daily Beast,  “It’s as if the Japanese courts said that there is no one responsible at all. The argument that TEPCO executives would have had to shut down the power plant to put safety measures into place, therefore they had reason not to do it, makes no sense. It is the same as saying corporate profits matter more than people. The Japanese courts care more about the well-being of a company than a person. At least the case established that they knew of the danger...and did nothing.”The Real Fukushima Fallout Isn't RadiationThe designated prosecutors in the case may appeal and demand a second trial. In Japan, prosecutors do have the right to appeal a case. Not guilty verdicts are rare and occur in less than one percent of all criminal cases. In general, prosecutors almost always appeal when losing the first round, but the prosecutors in this case are civilian lawyers. It is not clear what will happen next, or if anything will happen at all. Nuclear power plant operators in Japan have faced charges of criminal negligence resulting in death in the past and were found guilty. In April 2003, the Mito District Court found six of employees of JCO guilty over a fatal nuclear accident. They ruled that the company had allowed workers to use buckets to pour uranium solution into a processing tank, causing a nuclear fission chain reaction that resulted in the deaths of workers. The guilty were given suspended sentences and served no time in jail.Hiroyuki Kawai, a lawyer who represents the 5,700 Fukushima residents who filed the original criminal complaint, said in a press conference, “It’s a terrible verdict. Yet, if there had been no indictment, the evidence would have never seen the light of day. In that sense, [the trial] has a historical significance.” Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


Republicans Slam Democrats Uninterested in Spying Investigation
Wed, 18 Sep 2019 13:38:00 -0400

Republicans Slam Democrats Uninterested in Spying InvestigationWhy don't they want to know?


Every Photo of the New 2020 Honda CR-V
Wed, 18 Sep 2019 11:37:00 -0400

Every Photo of the New 2020 Honda CR-V


China Detained FedEx Pilot in New Blow for Delivery Giant
Thu, 19 Sep 2019 21:36:22 -0400

China Detained FedEx Pilot in New Blow for Delivery Giant(Bloomberg) -- A FedEx Corp. pilot was temporarily detained in Southeastern China after authorities found an item in his luggage prior to boarding a commercial flight, marking the delivery firm’s latest setback in the country.The pilot, who was held in the city of Guangzhou, was later released on bail and the company is working with relevant authorities to understand the facts better, Memphis-based FedEx said in an email. China’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs didn’t immediately reply to a faxed query.While FedEx didn’t provide details, the Wall Street Journal reported earlier that the pilot was a former U.S. Air Force colonel who was detained a week ago after he was found carrying nonmetallic pellets used in low-power replica air guns. Chinese authorities are alleging the pilot was illegally carrying ammunition and have started a criminal probe, according to the Journal, which cited people familiar with the matter.FedEx has been under particular scrutiny in recent months, after Huawei Technologies Co. said documents it asked to be shipped from Japan to China were diverted to the U.S. instead without authorization. In another incident, FedEx said it mistakenly rejected a package containing a Huawei phone being sent to the U.S. from the U.K., a claim China rebuffed. Separately, police in China’s Fujian province started an investigation into a package containing a gun delivered by FedEx to a company in China, state media reported in August. Chinese authorities also began probing FedEx on suspicion of illegally handling a package sent to Hong Kong containing knives, Xinhua News Agency reported in early September.The fracas over the Huawei packages has seen FedEx targeted in Chinese state media, with Beijing considering adding the company to a list of so-called unreliable entities it is drafting, people familiar with the matter told Bloomberg in June. China Mulls FedEx Blacklisting After Huawei Delivery ErrorsAfter the U.S. slapped curbs on Huawei, China’s Commerce Ministry announced the creation of the list in late May to target firms that the government says damage the interests of domestic companies.\--With assistance from Thomas Black and Feifei Shen.To contact the reporter on this story: Young-Sam Cho in Hong Kong at ycho2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Young-Sam Cho at ycho2@bloomberg.net, Emma O'BrienFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Ex-lover in corn rake killing: Woman was afraid of husband
Thu, 19 Sep 2019 11:30:40 -0400

Ex-lover in corn rake killing: Woman was afraid of husbandThe field manager of an Iowa hog farm testified that a woman with whom he was having an affair told him last year she was deathly afraid of her husband — a man now accused of using a corn rake to kill her. Jerry Frasher testified Wednesday in the trial of Todd Mullis. Mullis is charged with first-degree murder in the slaying of Amy Mullis on Nov. 10 at the farm about 40 miles (64 kilometers) west of Dubuque.


Three hunters mauled in grizzly bear attacks at Yellowstone: 'He was in their face before they even had chance to grab a gun'
Wed, 18 Sep 2019 17:37:39 -0400

Three hunters mauled in grizzly bear attacks at Yellowstone: 'He was in their face before they even had chance to grab a gun'Three hunters were badly hurt in two separate grizzly bear attacks in Montana on the same day, state officials have said.All three suffered “moderate to severe” injuries after being mauled by a lone bear in the Gravelley Mountains on Monday, according to the Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks agency.


Trump wants you to think he's racist so you won't notice he's corrupt and killing jobs
Wed, 18 Sep 2019 18:06:19 -0400

Trump wants you to think he's racist so you won't notice he's corrupt and killing jobs'Who is the real racist, the person warning about illegal immigrants or the person saying that’s racist?' When that’s the debate, Donald Trump wins.


Prosecutors: 2 Chicago gangbangers executed 9-year-old boy in revenge killing against his father's rival gang
Thu, 19 Sep 2019 08:12:31 -0400

Prosecutors: 2 Chicago gangbangers executed 9-year-old boy in revenge killing against his father's rival gang2 Chicago gangbangers executed a 9-year-old boy in a revenge killing against his father's rival gang. The boy’s father is now in jail for a shooting in retaliation of his sons slaying.


Chicken plants lured them. Feds jailed them. How Mississippi's immigration crisis unfolded
Wed, 18 Sep 2019 14:59:30 -0400

Chicken plants lured them. Feds jailed them. How Mississippi's immigration crisis unfoldedUndocumented immigrants helped build poultry into Mississippi's richest agricultural commodity.


Mechanic Accused of Sabotaging American Airlines Flight May Have Ties to Terrorism, Prosecutors Say
Thu, 19 Sep 2019 10:51:59 -0400

Mechanic Accused of Sabotaging American Airlines Flight May Have Ties to Terrorism, Prosecutors SayProsecutors said a mechanic accused of tampering with an American Airlines flight in Miami had terrorist sympathies.


U.S. to withdraw and withhold funds from Afghanistan, blames corruption
Thu, 19 Sep 2019 09:15:11 -0400

U.S. to withdraw and withhold funds from Afghanistan, blames corruptionWASHINGTON/KABUL (Reuters) - U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said on Thursday the United States would withdraw about $100 million earmarked for an energy infrastructure project in Afghanistan and withhold a further $60 million in planned assistance, blaming corruption and a lack of transparency in the country. Pompeo said in a statement the United States would complete the infrastructure project, but would do so using an "'off-budget' mechanism", faulting Afghanistan for an "inability to transparently manage U.S. government resources".


Michelle Malkin Smears Cokie Roberts on the Day of Her Death: ‘One of the First Guilty Culprits of Fake News’
Wed, 18 Sep 2019 03:44:03 -0400

Michelle Malkin Smears Cokie Roberts on the Day of Her Death: ‘One of the First Guilty Culprits of Fake News’Charley Gallay/Getty for International Innovators of Justice/American Justice AllianceHours after the world learned that journalist Cokie Roberts had passed away following complications from breast cancer, right-wing provocateur Michelle Malkin took a swipe at the reporter’s legacy by calling her “one of the first guilty culprits of fake news.”Taking part in a panel at the Paley Center on Tuesday, Malkin joined an array of liberal and conservative commentators and media figures to discuss whether the media is biased.At one point in the discussion, Malkin—who has recently been making the media rounds hawking her latest anti-immigrant book—took aim at Roberts.“Cokie Roberts, of course, passed away today and God bless her for an incredible career that she had but I distinctly remember that she was one of the first guilty culprits of fake news,” she declared.“We’re doing this today?” CNN chief media correspondent Brian Stelter, who was also on the panel, interjected.“Yes, yes we are,” Malkin confirmed.“You’re attacking her today,” Stelter continued. “I just want to be clear: The body isn’t even cold yet.”Malkin, meanwhile, said her remark was “pertinent” to the issue of “fake news,” bringing up an instance in 1994 when Roberts stood in front of a projection of the Capitol to do an ABC News report from the State of the Union address.“This was a deliberate attempt to deceive the viewing public into thinking she was actually there live covering it,” Malkin added. “Fake news has existed far longer than before President Trump even had the idea of running for office.”Malkin’s remarks, predictably, were not well received by the attendees, with many in the audience shouting at her to leave and go home. Tuesday was far from the first time that Malkin has kicked dirt on a prominent figure after he or she has passed away. During this year’s Conservative Political Action Conference, Malkin slammed the “ghost of John McCain” for what she described as his weak immigration policies.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


Here Are the 5 Biggest Nuclear Weapons Tests Ever Conducted
Wed, 18 Sep 2019 06:42:00 -0400

Here Are the 5 Biggest Nuclear Weapons Tests Ever ConductedWe've got them ranked.


Police: Pirates' Vázquez attempted to have sex with minor
Wed, 18 Sep 2019 16:09:11 -0400

Police: Pirates' Vázquez attempted to have sex with minorPittsburgh Pirates closer Felipe Vázquez was being held Wednesday in a Pennsylvania jail on multiple felony charges after allegedly telling investigators he attempted to have sex with an underage girl during a meeting at her house in 2017. Vázquez is charged with statutory sexual assault, unlawful contact with a minor and corruption of minors, all felonies, and a misdemeanor count of indecent assault of a person under 16 years old. The charges are related to Vázquez's alleged encounters with a girl starting in 2017, when she was 13 and living about an hour east of downtown Pittsburgh.



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